Science in Images: WIB, Seattle Business Casual Event

The WIB, Seattle “Your guide to Business Casual” event was a hit, with many of Seattle’s best and brightest scientists turning out for the evening. Featuring presentations from Eileen Fisher, Kendra Scott and MAC cosmetics, the event covered all the basics of creating a work-ready wardrobe.

Here are some of the tips that stood out.

Create a Capsule:
At Eileen Fisher, the emphasis was on creating a work wardrobe that really did all the hard work for you. By starting with 3 basic items (pants, dress, camisole) you had the foundation to build any outfit on top of. Simply pair a soft sweatshirt with the boxy shell and black pant, to create a laid-back at-the-bench work look, or swap it out for a soft blazer, to be boardroom ready. The same goes with the tank dress. Flattering on all figures, it can be paired with a smart shirt for a business event, or a loose knit for comfort whilst still looking professional. The emphasis here really is that less is more.

  

Keep it Simple:
At Kendra Scott, we talked about elevating an outfit without going OTT. The answer? Layers. By using multiple simple pieces, think delicate chains and pendants, you can create a layered look that still keeps it professional. An easy way to dress an outfit up or down. And why stop with necklaces? Layering clean bracelets, or stacking rings can give and equally dramatic look and finish an outfit.

 

Tone it Down:
My personal favorite presentation was MAC cosmetics. Getting a work make-up look is difficult, and the balance between flawless and too much foundation is very, very real. MAC pointed to keeping it natural. Choose tones that compliment your skin and soft hues. Their top tips? For starters, if possible always opt for concealer over foundation. Apply a small dab to the back of your hand, and apply to necessary areas with a soft brush. Think under the eyes, any blemishes and the nose. Using the brush will help keep excess oil off your skin, and stop you applying too much!

Next add a subtle blush or highlight. Our make-up artist described good blush as “a road-map to the eyes”. Start out just above the cheek and sweep upwards towards the corner of the eye. Just beware, blush should be light and a flattering color.

So to follow that road-map, put focus on the eyes. Our eyes are the key to much of our expression, and when it comes to make-up they give us a unique opportunity to express ourselves. Pair a simple mascara and liner with a pop of your favorite shade at the corner of the eye, for a fun but safe look.

The final piece of advice? Don’t keep old mascara! Mascara is a beautiful breeding ground for bacterial (more here), and one way your eyes are susceptible to infection. If it’s more than 6 months old, throw it away.

And if that all seems like too much information, you can schedule a personal appointment with one of their artists, who will walk you through the whole process!

In summary?
The take-home message from the entire evening- Think Simplicity.

By owning a few key pieces of clothing and jewelry, you can create multiple looks that transform at the swap of a jacket. And when it comes to make-up, keep it light and simple but don’t be afraid to add a bit of personal expression.

Science in Images: ISMRM, Honolulu Hawaii

This years ISMRM meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii has been a roaring success for the MSU MCIL team.

With 4 oral presentations, a study group presentation and award, as well as an award for scientific merit, the MSU Radiology department has demonstrated that their research has value on a global scale.


Dr Barbara Blanco Fernández, awarded 1st place in the Molecular and Cellular imaging study group.

The Molecular and Cellular imaging group, a focus group of the ISMRM community, aims to provide an informal atmosphere to discuss the progress, evaluation, and application of molecular and cellular imaging using Magnetic resonance technology.

One highlight of the group is its championing of the exceptional research being performed by it’s junior members. Having delivered both a high impact abstract, as well as an oral presentation as part of the general meeting, Dr Blanco Fernández was selected to present her work on nanoparticles for immunology at the group chapter meeting, being awarded the top prize for research excellence.

The highly competitive and prestigious award was for Barbara’s research highlighting the use of Chitin and Chitin-materials for vaccines and nanocarriers for immunotherapy.


The group also received recognition for its outstanding research in the form of multiple accepted presentations.

Dr Christiane Mallett, presented a poster on her work on using MRI to measure acetaminophen toxicity in the liver.

Prof Erik M Shapiro presented a talk on behalf of Jamal Afridi on his PhD work, investigating Machine learning for intelligent detection of cellular transplants using MRI.

Dr Dorela Shuboni-Mulligan gave presentation on her groundbreaking work, investigating the link between diabetes and dysregulation of OATP transporters.


The final oral presentation and award was presented to myself, for the use of Polymer and Peptides as Theranostic agents. Peptides have been my area of specialty since undergraduate, so getting to apply my knowledge to molecular imaging and cancer therapy was a rewarding challenge for me.

I presented my work on switchable MRI imaging agent, capable of the non-invasive detection of specific cell types for cellular transplants, cancer detection and therapeutic delivery.

The ISMRM recognizes research excellence by awarding high-impact abstracts. Having scored in the top 5% of all submitted abstracts, I was awarded the Summa cum Laude IRMRM merit award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can I get a round of applause for the achievent of all these awesome #WomeninSTEM?

Science in Images: Diversity in Science

Our research lab currently has 8 nationalities, no less than 7 belief systems, and scientific backgrounds that range from chemistry to computer science. 


We are all very different, and at a time where discrimination based on difference is sadly a normal, it is important that I say that it is our variation that makes us successful and allows us to thrive as a research group.

Diversity in the workplace has been at the forefront of socioeconomic issues for many years. Increasing globalisation means that interactions with differing backgrounds are common place: insular populations are no longer the standard and people are part of a global economy.

Many see this paradigm shift as something to fear, that somehow embracing multiculturalism will diminish and devalue their own values and threaten their beliefs. There are many issues with globalisation that we should be wary of, but this is not one of them.

Exposure to a range of ideas allows us to form more balanced views on the world, ultimately leading to a decrease in in-built bias. The presence of a range of diverse perspectives also allows a groups to form much broader ideas, including perspectives individuals alone wouldn’t have considered. When this is viewed altogether, the society that is built from variation is one of increased respect and understanding.

In the context of research then, it is easy to see why a diverse cultural and scientific group can achieve more together than each individual could alone.

Working with those unlike ourselves offers us an untapped resource of knowledge, and challenges us even more so to validate those methodologies and understandings we base much of our research on.

Science in Images: Melanoma Cells

Over the last few days I’ve been struggling about what to post. America, as well as the world, has been engulfed in the post-election fall out and I don’t need to tell anyone how to feel about it. I’ve chosen instead to focus on positive things, so here is a picture from one of my many current projects.

These are B16/F10 cells, or melanoma. With these cells our lab is trying to specifically target cancer, allowing us to treat locally.

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Cells can be influenced by external stimuli: receptors at the surface of a cell (built into its cell membrane) can act by receiving (binding to) extracellular molecules. I like to think of these as tiny code-lock doors. If we know the code, we can engineering a material to have the code inbuilt, allowing us to specifically interact with only those cells. Targeted treatment in this way would allow many patients to live better, longer lives.

Currently the therapeutic option for many patients, especially post-tumour removal, is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy has many side-effects; hair loss, weight loss,  nausea, vomiting, fatigue, as well as issues with drug resistance. By utilising cell surface receptors and only targeting the cells we wish destroy, we can make treatment more effective, less invasive and improve the quality of life for many.

There’s a lot of work to do before such therapy will be clinically available but every day, and every bit of research takes us closer. I, like many others, do this work because I want to help people, all people, so that’s what I’ll be focusing on.

 

Science in Images: Tissue Mimics

If you ask most people, they have an opinion on the use of animals in research. Despite the need for animals in some situations, there are many scenarios where viable alternatives do exist.

Imaged below are hydrogels: soft-solids consisting of over 90% water. Hydrogels are already heavily utilised in research, from tissue engineering to drug delivery.

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Hydrogels are great candidates for tissue mimics and in turn, the replacement of animals in some experiments. The properties of the gel can be individually tailored and designed such that the strength, charge and other characteristics are similar to a tissue sample.

In this case the hydogel is comprised of agarose, a polysacharide (carbohydrate), whose long chains make up the framework around which the water resides.

Hydrogels with similar properties to brain tissue were fabricated and used to test a large number of MRI contrast agents: the final therapeutic use is as an agent for labelling stem cells, for implantation into the brain, for cell therapy.

For cellular therapy to be effective, we need to know if cells remain in the correct location and are performing the correct function. One way to do is to label them before implantation, so we can image them with an MRI.

Samples of contrast agent are prepared and injected into the gel, before they are imaged. By using hydogels in this way, we can test many combinations of contrast agents quickly, cost-effectively and without the use of animals.

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Science in Images: Fluorescent Staining of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Mouse mesenchymal stem cells, incubated with polymer nanoparticles encapsulating the dye coumarin_6 (green) and the enzyme Cellulase (red).

Cells are incubated in chambers on a glass slide. During incubation endocytosis occurs: cells uptake the nanoparticles into them.

Cells have a mass of surface receptors, which can allow for very specific uptake. The uptake of nanoparticles by cells in this way can have huge implications for medical treatments, such directed chemotherapy.

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After the cells have been incubated for around 24 hours, they are fixed and stained with further dyes, so the cytoskeleton (purple) and the nucleus (blue) of the cell can be seen. The first image shows a low magnification of the cells.

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The next image is a Z-stack confocal image. In other words, multiple images of the cell were taken at different spacing in the Z-direction, to get slices throughout the cell. The Centre image shows the XY direction, or the cell parallel to the glass slide. The images below and beside this show the ZY and the ZX of the cell, or the perpendicular directions. What we can see using this technique is exactly where both the nanoparticles and the enzyme are within the cell.

Science in Images: Prussian Blue Staining

Rat mesenchymal stem cells, extracted from bone marrow, and labelled with Iron Oxide nanoparticles, before re-implantation. The image shows a section of the brain, stained with Eosin (pink) and then Prussian blue (blue/purple).

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Prussian blue is a common histology stain; used to detect the presence of iron. The stain uses solutions of potassium ferrocyanide and hydrochloric acid to stain tissue. Iron deposits are then stained as blue or purple.